CEI Projects

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Senior Fellow Angela Logomasini talks about her new Consumer’s Guide to Chemical Risk.

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Senior Fellow William Yeatman is skeptical of an EPA report claiming the Clean Air Act will have nearly $2 trillion in annual benefits by 2020.

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CEI Fellow Marc Scribner talks about his new paper, “Bait and Reciprocal Switch: Forced Access Regulation Threatens the Rail Renaissance.”

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The Competitive Enterprise Institute celebrates its 30th anniversary this month. Founder and Chairman Fred Smith reflects on CEI’s accomplishments and what the next 30 years will hold.

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Last week was Stop Government Abuse Week in Congress, and the House passed a number of reform bills that would increase government transparency. One of the bills that passed, the ALERT Act, was partially based on reform ideas from CEI Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews.

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The Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week in a case that could determine whether or not the EPA has the authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. CEI Senior Fellow Marlo Lewis has written about the case for Forbes.

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CEI Fellow Ryan Young discusses the large stock of existing regulations and the rapid flow of new regulations.

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Marlo Lewis examines a State Department report finding that Keystone serves the national interest and finds opposing arguments wanting.

This is supposed to be a year of action. Unfortunately, there will likely be very little action in the area of regulatory reform. Over at The Hill‘s Congress blog, Wayne Crews and I make the case for reining in the regulatory state as a way to improve the federal government’s fiscal health. Here’s a taste:

Take the much-discussed annual federal deficits under presidents Bush and Obama. In recent years, the government has been spending a little less than a quarter of the nation’s GDP, but its revenues rarely top 20 percent of GDP. Given Congress’s and the president’s continuing unwillingness to reduce spending to match revenues, they could turn instead to regulatory reform as a budget balancer.

A deregulatory “stimulus” would help create the conditions for rapid economic growth. If government’s 20 percent slice comes from a much larger pie, revenue gains could cover most, if not all of the shortfall, eventually erasing deficits. This, of course, would require keeping spending in check, which may be wishful thinking. But it offers a solution, if politicians really want one.

Read the whole thing here.

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Vice President for Strategy Iain Murray analyzes the president’s 2014 State of the Union address.